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completing math activities, and volunteering. Throughout the summer, WKYC aired reports from participating libraries, which helped to increase the libraries’ visibility. At Shaker Library alone, over 1,200 students took part in this exciting program, recording many thousands of hours spent reading and participating in activities. new budget may bring First Sustained growth in Statewide Library Funding Since the Late 1990s Ohio’s new two-year budget, which was approved in June and went into effect on July 1, may provide some relief for public libraries that have seen state funding reduced by 24 percent since 2007 and 30 percent since 2001. The Public Library Fund (PLF) is determined as a certain percentage of the state’s General Revenue Fund (GRF) that is derived from various sources, including income tax and sales tax. The PLF was set at 1.66 percent during the previous biennial budget but has been raised to 1.70 percent with the new legislation. Because the GRF has fluctuated due to a variety of tax cuts and tax increases that were part of the new budget, as well as due to growth in the state economy, it has been estimated that the PLF could grow statewide by $10 million per year during the biennium. If that forecast is correct, the PLF would increase by 5.7 percent in FY2016 and a further 3.9 percent in FY2017. Though this is positive news, it still leaves the PLF at 1997 levels. Public libraries would need consistent growth like this through the rest of the decade just to reach the high water mark of 2001. Library Local history collection materials to be Featured in national exhibit 20 ShAKerONLINE.COM | FALL 2015 A national exhibit showcasing the African- American experience in American suburbs from 1945 to the present will feature Shaker Heights and include research and material from the Library’s Local History Collection. The exhibit, “Black Suburbia: Levittown to Ferguson and the Struggle for the American Dream,” opened September 25 at the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, a research library and exhibit space of the New York Public Library, located in Harlem, and will be on display through December 31. The exhibition has a national scope, but the main focus is on three communities: Hempstead on Long Island, New York; Shaker Heights, and certain Los Angeles suburbs, particularly Compton and Baldwin Hills. The exhibit’s focus on Shaker Heights centers on racial integration efforts by the Ludlow Community Association and other community associations from 1957 to 1980. The exhibit features several primary documents on loan from the Library’s Local History Collection. After the show closes, the exhibit will travel to the spotlighted communities in 2016. Stay tuned for its arrival in Shaker. A Look at the cleveland cultural gardens with george parras Western Reserve Architectural Historians and the Library will host a talk by George Parras on the Cleveland Cultural Gardens at 7 pm October at Main Library. The Gardens are in Rockefeller Park, a 254-acre setting between University Circle and Lake Erie. John D. Rockefeller donated the land to the city in 1896 in celebration of Cleveland’s first centennial. Ernest Bowditch, a renowned Boston landscape architect, designed a meandering parkway flanked by wide-open green space framed by steeply sloped terrain. Learn more about this beautiful space from Parras, a Shaker resident and former president of the Gardens. Call 216-991-2030 for reservations. meet the AuthOr meet the Author An evening with Anthony doerr 7 pm Monday, October 12 at University School and live streamed to Main Library. This event with Pulitzer Prize-winning author and University School alumnus was sold out within two days, but will be live streamed to the Library for those who could not get tickets. Please call Main Library 216-991-2030 to reserve your place. money, misfortune, and millionaires with Alan dutka 7 pm Wednesday, October 28 at Bertram Woods Branch. Bertram and Cleveland’s The is a societies, centers. books history Dutka is a native Clevelander and the author of Misfortune on Cleveland’s Millionaires’ Row. The retired executive and author a popular speaker at historical libraries, and community He has written four business books and published five Cleveland history books including Cleveland in the Gilded Age. engineering a novel with d. m. pulley 7 pm Thursday, November 5 at Main Library. Local author D.M. Pulley will talk about her award-winning, breakthrough novel, The Dead Key, which was inspired by her work surveying the Ameritrust complex in 2001 and 2002. Learn how she came to write her novel, how long it took, the research involved, and more. Pulley is an engineer specializing in the rehabilitation of historic buildings and forensic investigations of building failures. She lives in Shaker Heights with her husband and two children, and is currently at work on her second novel. 7 at 7 Main talk breakthrough which surveying 2001 write the @ Shaker Library


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